Forum

rent land to dairy ...
 
Notifications
Clear all

rent land to dairy farm and organic

Page 2 / 2

James o Brien
(@james-o-brien)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 115
 

Yup chose an easy calving limousine bull 2 years ago killed 2 cows and knocked the shit out of 3


ReplyQuote
Roon
 Roon
(@roon)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 218
 

Ah that sucks!  I assumed you guys also watched that kinda thing but really didn't know. 


ReplyQuote
mcleanfarms
(@mcleanfarms)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

i'am thinking bull breed


ReplyQuote
mcleanfarms
(@mcleanfarms)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

what size tractors would everyone recommend horse power because my 1949 John Deere B probably  would  and economical  tractor for a modern dairy farm  


ReplyQuote
James o Brien
(@james-o-brien)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 115
 

We have a 1989 Ford 7610 works pretty well has 97 horse power depends on how much you will be doing with the tractor and what size implements your going to use


ReplyQuote
mcleanfarms
(@mcleanfarms)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

5 bottom plow  1060 gehl chopper  jd 456 round baler I've been looking at a ford tw10


ReplyQuote
maplegrovefarms
(@maplegrovefarms)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 1073
 

I guess I find a kind of weird doing Dairy with a bull. AI is nice because you pick each cow individually and clean up her genetics.

If you get an older tractor make sure you can get parts for it.

She have a round baler so that can take care of your dry hay and haylage. You got the chopper to take care of your silage. Are you doing a small high moisture corn unit or ground dry corn? The corns a little more expensive to buy from a co-op but having a hopper bin that the coop just keeps it full have your minerals salts and soy meal mixed in with it. Then you're not spending money on more equipment to try and store and handle high moisture corn.


ReplyQuote
James o Brien
(@james-o-brien)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 115
 

What we do is 3 to 4 weeks of AI and then the final 4 to 5 weeks with a bull to pick up any empties. My plan for the heifers in the future is to inject them with a hormone that makes them come in heat and have 85% calved in one week


ReplyQuote
maplegrovefarms
(@maplegrovefarms)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 1073
 

Yeah that would be normal program.

We didn't use a bull for clean up.

When you had a a group of opens then you gave him the shot then 2 days later they were all in heat and you bred them.

If you had a heifer that just after several times wouldn't take then you fatten her like a steer. If you had an older cow that just wouldn't take then you culled her.

 

 


ReplyQuote
James o Brien
(@james-o-brien)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 115
 

No fattening we'd cull her we don't keep no passengers not enough feed to be doing that


ReplyQuote
maplegrovefarms
(@maplegrovefarms)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 1073
 

Oh.

What do you do with your bull calves?


ReplyQuote
James o Brien
(@james-o-brien)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 115
 

Sell them as young as possible were planning on selling them at 2 weeks of age once the 2019 calving season starts reduce work load and disease pressure 


ReplyQuote
mcleanfarms
(@mcleanfarms)
Eminent Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

thanks for all the help 


ReplyQuote
James o Brien
(@james-o-brien)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 115
 

Your welcome good luck with what ever you decide to do in the future


ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2
Share:

.

%d bloggers like this: